Home

Princeton Satellite Systems, Inc. is a small company developing advanced technology for the aerospace and energy sectors. Our agility and focus enables us to rapidly develop innovative solutions to a wide range of aerospace and energy problems. Our commercial hardware and software products enable our customers to pursue the same types of demanding, state-of-the-art applications.

Our core values include a dedication to learning and an emphasis on innovation. We believe that each employee can grow intellectually, learn new disciplines, and contribute original ideas to our business areas.

Recent Posts

Toolboxes 2019.1 Now Available

Over 100 new functions were added or had major updates in Version 2019.1. Improvements were made to dozens of existing functions to improve their performance and expand their applications. Built-in demos were added to many functions to make them easier to use in your applications

In the Aircraft Control Toolbox, we added new tools for aircraft simulation. This includes a model builder allowing you to create mass and aerodynamic models from a CAD model that you load from in a Wavefront OBJ format. The model builder GUI is shown below. This  tool is matched with a new 6 degree of freedom aircraft simulation with an easier-to-use model viewer, shown under the GUI. The simulation lets you plug in your own aerodynamics and engine models, use the built-in defaults or other models from the toolbox.

The Spacecraft Control Toolbox has many new features. For example, you can now create cross-scale constellations and control them, or any other constellation, using control laws recently developed at PSS and presented at IWSCFF in 2019. A cross-scale constellation is shown below under active control.

We added the Fusion Toolbox for the development of nuclear fusion reactors. This function includes physics models, reactor models, thermal models and many other tools.  Both core reactor and balance of plant functions are included. 

The below shows a plot from one of the nuclear fusion tools which finds the fusion reaction rate for the aneutronic Deuterium-Helium3 fuel cycle as a function of ion temperature.

  1. Artemis: From Gateway to Low Lunar Orbit 1 Reply
  2. Artemis: NASA RFP for Lunar Landers Leave a reply
  3. Trajectory Design for a High Speed Aircraft Leave a reply
  4. IWSCFF 2019 Leave a reply
  5. Mr. Fusion (8 Wheeler) Leave a reply
  6. ARPA-E Summit in Denver 1 Reply
  7. The PFRC on Fusion Shark Tank Leave a reply
  8. Realizing 2001: A Space Odyssey 1 Reply
  9. Updates for the 2019 Aircraft Control Toolbox Leave a reply