Interstellar Documentary and New Novel for Fusion Fans

So fusion fans, there are two new ways to see DFD explored as fusion propulsion in the popular media:

  1. The Living Universe documentary series now on Curiosity Stream
  2. The Enceladus Mission” novel now in English from Amazon

The Living Universe is both a feature film for IMAX theaters and now a four-part documentary series. We blogged about our interviews in January and the series is now available on Curiosity Stream, a service dedicated to documentaries! Episode 2,”The Explorers” features a segment on DFD narrated by PSS engineer Stephanie Thomas, in addition to discussing plasma and antimatter propulsion. Here is an article about the series from Broadway World. You need to sign up for an account on Curiosity Stream to watch, which is free for 7 days and then $3 per month.

“The Encedalus Mission” by internationally best-selling hard science fiction author Brandon Q. Morris was originally written in German, and features the DFD as the propulsion technology on a mission to study newly detected life in the Saturn system; an array of six DFDs power the spaceship.  Early reviews are favorable! The book is available in paperback or for Kindle.

Send us a comment and tell us what you think if you watch the show or read the book!

Princeton University Science and Technology Job Fair 2018

Princeton Satellite Systems had a table at the Princeton University Science and Technology Job Fair on Friday, October 12. Many companies attended including the IBM Thomas J. Watson Laboratory, Facebook and Siemens.

We had on display hardware and software that involved the work of interns at PSS. The exhibits were of great interest to the many students who came by our table.

From left to right is an iPhone App for talking with a reconnaissance satellite, a lunar landing simulation on the LCD monitor, parts of an optical navigation system, a Class E RF amplifier, a reaction wheel and a frame for a small satellite. Many students who came by were very knowledgeable about our work.

Here I am talking with one of the students.

It was great event! We look forward to talking with the students when we interview for summer and full time jobs in January.

NASA SBIR Phase III: Low Energy Mission Planning

Hello PSS fans! This is Charles Swanson, recently minted doctor of plasma physics and PSS’s newest employee. It’s my distinct pleasure to discuss our most recent NASA contract: A Phase III SBIR to integrate our Low Energy Mission Planning Toolbox (LEMPT) into NASA’s open source Orbit Determination Toolbox (ODTBX).

Have you read about the kinds of maneuvers conducted by Hiten and AsiaSat 3 that allowed them to reach orbits that would seemingly be outside their Delta-V budgets? Have you always wondered how one goes about planning such maneuvers?

What about the Lunar Gateway from which NASA plans to stage missions to the surface of the Moon in the coming decades? What kinds of clever orbital tricks can we use to get to, from, and about the Moon with the minimum possible fuel?

That’s what LEMPT is for. LEMPT is a suite of tools written in MATLAB for the planning of low energy missions, the kinds of missions that loop way outside the target orbit of the Moon and deep into chaotic regions of the gravitational landscape. Here’s an example:

This LEO to Lunar Orbit mission takes just one impulsive burn of 2.8 km/s. It loops way outside the Moon and back in for a ballistic capture.

To go from LEO to a low lunar orbit usually takes almost 4 km/s of Delta-V. The maneuver depicted takes only 2.8 km/s. This is the kind of planning capability that NASA would like for their ODTBX. From now until December, we’ll be integrating the LEMPT into ODTBX, where it will help NASA mission planners evaluate all of their options along the trade-off of mission time and Delta-V.

The orbit above doesn’t look anything like the Keplerian ellipse that we know and love. That’s because this is a four-body system, with the Sun, Earth, Moon, and spacecraft all interacting gravitationally. Even the three-body system is famously chaotic: here are two examples of the kind of distinctly weird-looking orbits you can get:

This is a periodic orbit in the Sun-Earth-Spacecraft system. Periodic orbits are rare in such systems.

This orbit starts with only 0.01% more velocity than the periodic orbit but escapes the Earth entirely. This is an example of chaos.

It’s this chaos that the LEMPT leverages to plan exotic and efficient maneuvers.

Phase II NASA STTR on superconducting magnets selected!

We are pleased to announce that our Phase II STTR proposal, “Superconducting Coils for Small Nuclear Fusion Rocket Engines,” was one of 20 selected for award by NASA in this year’s round! The full list of winners is posted on NASA’s website.

Our briefing chart prepared as part of the proposal is shown below:Briefing chart

We will be building a testbed with a split-pair superconducting coil (two windings with a gap between them) and performing experiments to assess the impact of operating the magnets in the vicinity of the FRC plasma. Applications of the technology go beyond fusion reactors, for example science payloads and high-performance motors for hybrid electric aircraft.

My Summer Internship

The past 10 weeks at Princeton Satellite Systems have been a life changing experience. During my summer off from the University of Pennsylvania, I have worked as an intern for the company. This gave me the opportunity to learn from trailblazers in the industry and to be immersed in a community passionate and dedicated to the work.

I first heard of Princeton Satellite Systems at the Dawn of Private Space Science Symposium in 2017. After that, Mike graciously agreed to come speak for the Penn Aerospace Club in the fall and the Ivy Space Coalition Conference the next spring. Everyone in attendance was fascinated by the presentation and I felt so lucky that I would have the chance to learn so much more soon. Connections like these are what drive the aerospace community and as I expand my communication I hope to stay closely in touch with the people I came to know at PSS.

Through my work, I’ve been doing a lot of Matlab modeling: sizing the components for the Direct Fusion Drive engine, testing a rotating detonation engine, and MHD plasma simulation. The idea of these technologies enhancing propulsive power and efficiency is fascinating and has great potential for the future of space travel.

My summer at Princeton Satellite Systems has helped me to enhance my technical understanding and skills: I’ve definitely gained a ton of experience in Matlab, and all of my studying of plasma modeling should give me a head start in my fluids class next semester! I’ve also gained a much better understanding of how the professional world works. I got to help write and edit proposals, sit in on phone calls, and even attend the NIAC meeting at Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.

I think that there’s a great benefit in working at a smaller company. You are given plenty of real responsibility and see the changes happening in real time. I will definitely take the lessons I’ve learned this summer and apply them to my education as well as my future career as a mechanical engineer.

I am so grateful for this opportunity. Everyone has been so kind and helpful and patient. The time has flown by, and it definitely made staying in my little Princeton dorm with no air conditioning well worth it! I’ll miss coming in to work every day but I can’t wait to see all the big things that PSS accomplishes.

 

PSS Dress Code: What is “business casual”, anyway?

Our interns always ask us, “What’s the dress code?” Our dress code at the office is business casual – which according to Wikipedia is not that well defined! We are probably on the more casual side of business casual. Here are some guidelines:

What to wear:

  • Khakis, trousers, skirts, polos, button-down shirts, blouses, sweaters
  • Dark or colored denim trousers
  • Shorts and sandals are OK in the summer – we prefer to turn the thermostat up and save money on A/C!

What NOT to wear:

  • Ripped or faded jeans
  • Very short skirts or shorts
  • Leggings – leggings are not pants! Leggings should be treated as footless tights and always paired with dresses or tunics.
  • Camisoles/spaghetti straps – camisoles are not blouses!
  • Flip-flops or sad beat-up sneakers

Anyone working on hardware should wear closed-toe shoes and tie back long hair, as in any lab space.

A side comment: my husband is a tech executive in New York, and he wears what I call the “tech uniform” to work every day: dark jeans from Banana Republic, button-down shirt, brown dress shoes, and a navy blazer. Now, guys in tech get away with this, but probably not lawyers! As PSS is solidly in the tech regime, we definitely take a more casual approach to “business casual”!

Young Women’s Conference in STEM

Princeton Satellite Systems attended the Young Women’s Conference in STEM in at the Frick Laboratory on the Princeton University campus again this year. We had an exhibit with spacecraft hardware and software. This include 3D printed models of our fusion reactor core and a 2 stage to orbit launch vehicle, star and navigation cameras, a circuit board for driving a fusion reactor and a 3U CubeSat frame . We were also running a simulation of a Lunar Landing simulation.

We met many enthusiastic students this year! It seemed that there were more high school students than in past years. A budding plasma physicist asked how we fuel the Direct Fusion Drive engine. Another student, looking at our Lunar Lander simulation display, asked what is a quaternion! The disassembled reaction wheel was very popular.  Some students wanted a detailed explanation about how the motor worked. One student wanted to know the electrical details of our RF board. Several were interested in our Army iPhone app. One wanted to know if she could get it from the App Store.

Other attendees included Lockheed Martin, the FBI and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Click on this image to see a video about the event.

It was a fun event, albeit exhausting given the four hours of continuous conversations. We do hope that we inspired some of the attendees to pursue careers in science, math and engineering!