Super Technologies at ICSS

Laxmi Prakash of Super Technologies, our distributor in India, attended the International Conference on Small Satellites in Hyperbad India on February 8, 2019

https://www.thehansindia.com/posts/index/Telangana/2019-02-08/International-Conference-on-Small-Satellites-and-Systems/490540

Here he is at his booth. Super Technologies represents several high technology aerospace companies.

ARPA-E Award for Compact Nuclear Fusion Power

Princeton Fusion Systems, a fully owned subsidiary of Princeton Satellite Systems, has been awarded $1.25 Million from ARPA-E for Low-Radioactivity Compact Fusion Devices

Today ARPA-E announced announced that PFS has received a competitive $1.25 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), as part of the Energy cohort of OPEN 2018.

Princeton Fusion Systems seeks to develop technologies to enable future commercial fusion power. Our team’s concept is a small, clean, and portable design based on a field-reversed-configuration plasma. The concept uses an innovative method called odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) to drive electrical current and heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. Under this award, the team will pursue improved electron and ion temperatures through RMF, as well as identify the modeling needed to elucidate the key heating and loss mechanisms for the fusion reactor concept. The team’s ultimate power plant design seeks a very small footprint for a compact, potentially transportable, distributed energy resource that is fully dispatchable and emissions-free.
PFS received this competitive award from ARPA-E’s OPEN 2018 program, in which teams develop innovative technologies to transform the nation’s energy system. OPEN solicitations are an open call to scientists and engineers for technologies across the entire scope of ARPA-E’s energy mission.

This work complements three NASA grants for the development of this technology for nuclear fusion rockets for human and robotic space exploration. This includes the NASA Phase II NIAC Grant, “Fusion-Enabled Pluto Orbiter and Lander,” and a NASA Phase II STTR, “Superconducting Coils for Small Nuclear Fusion Rocket Engines“, and a Phase I STTR, “High Efficiency RF Heating for Small Nuclear Fusion Rocket Engines.”. These contracts build on over 20 years of collaborative work between Princeton Fusion Systems and the Princeton University Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. This unique nuclear fusion concept was invented by Dr. Samuel Cohen of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

Princeton Satellite Systems was founded by Mr. Michael Paluszek in 1992 to develop advanced space and terrestrial technology. It has developed a wide range of space and terrestrial technology including advanced spacecraft control and navigation systems, formation flying systems and terrestrial energy systems including solar, wind and nuclear fusion.

Interstellar Documentary and New Novel for Fusion Fans

So fusion fans, there are two new ways to see DFD explored as fusion propulsion in the popular media:

  1. The Living Universe documentary series now on Curiosity Stream
  2. The Enceladus Mission” novel now in English from Amazon

The Living Universe is both a feature film for IMAX theaters and now a four-part documentary series. We blogged about our interviews in January and the series is now available on Curiosity Stream, a service dedicated to documentaries! Episode 2,”The Explorers” features a segment on DFD narrated by PSS engineer Stephanie Thomas, in addition to discussing plasma and antimatter propulsion. Here is an article about the series from Broadway World. You need to sign up for an account on Curiosity Stream to watch, which is free for 7 days and then $3 per month.

“The Encedalus Mission” by internationally best-selling hard science fiction author Brandon Q. Morris was originally written in German, and features the DFD as the propulsion technology on a mission to study newly detected life in the Saturn system; an array of six DFDs power the spaceship.  Early reviews are favorable! The book is available in paperback or for Kindle.

Send us a comment and tell us what you think if you watch the show or read the book!

Princeton University Science and Technology Job Fair 2018

Princeton Satellite Systems had a table at the Princeton University Science and Technology Job Fair on Friday, October 12. Many companies attended including the IBM Thomas J. Watson Laboratory, Facebook and Siemens.

We had on display hardware and software that involved the work of interns at PSS. The exhibits were of great interest to the many students who came by our table.

From left to right is an iPhone App for talking with a reconnaissance satellite, a lunar landing simulation on the LCD monitor, parts of an optical navigation system, a Class E RF amplifier, a reaction wheel and a frame for a small satellite. Many students who came by were very knowledgeable about our work.

Here I am talking with one of the students.

It was great event! We look forward to talking with the students when we interview for summer and full time jobs in January.

NASA SBIR Phase III: Low Energy Mission Planning

Hello PSS fans! This is Charles Swanson, recently minted doctor of plasma physics and PSS’s newest employee. It’s my distinct pleasure to discuss our most recent NASA contract: A Phase III SBIR to integrate our Low Energy Mission Planning Toolbox (LEMPT) into NASA’s open source Orbit Determination Toolbox (ODTBX).

Have you read about the kinds of maneuvers conducted by Hiten and AsiaSat 3 that allowed them to reach orbits that would seemingly be outside their Delta-V budgets? Have you always wondered how one goes about planning such maneuvers?

What about the Lunar Gateway from which NASA plans to stage missions to the surface of the Moon in the coming decades? What kinds of clever orbital tricks can we use to get to, from, and about the Moon with the minimum possible fuel?

That’s what LEMPT is for. LEMPT is a suite of tools written in MATLAB for the planning of low energy missions, the kinds of missions that loop way outside the target orbit of the Moon and deep into chaotic regions of the gravitational landscape. Here’s an example:

This LEO to Lunar Orbit mission takes just one impulsive burn of 2.8 km/s. It loops way outside the Moon and back in for a ballistic capture.

To go from LEO to a low lunar orbit usually takes almost 4 km/s of Delta-V. The maneuver depicted takes only 2.8 km/s. This is the kind of planning capability that NASA would like for their ODTBX. From now until December, we’ll be integrating the LEMPT into ODTBX, where it will help NASA mission planners evaluate all of their options along the trade-off of mission time and Delta-V.

The orbit above doesn’t look anything like the Keplerian ellipse that we know and love. That’s because this is a four-body system, with the Sun, Earth, Moon, and spacecraft all interacting gravitationally. Even the three-body system is famously chaotic: here are two examples of the kind of distinctly weird-looking orbits you can get:

This is a periodic orbit in the Sun-Earth-Spacecraft system. Periodic orbits are rare in such systems.

This orbit starts with only 0.01% more velocity than the periodic orbit but escapes the Earth entirely. This is an example of chaos.

It’s this chaos that the LEMPT leverages to plan exotic and efficient maneuvers.

Phase II NASA STTR on superconducting magnets selected!

We are pleased to announce that our Phase II STTR proposal, “Superconducting Coils for Small Nuclear Fusion Rocket Engines,” was one of 20 selected for award by NASA in this year’s round! The full list of winners is posted on NASA’s website.

Our briefing chart prepared as part of the proposal is shown below:Briefing chart

We will be building a testbed with a split-pair superconducting coil (two windings with a gap between them) and performing experiments to assess the impact of operating the magnets in the vicinity of the FRC plasma. Applications of the technology go beyond fusion reactors, for example science payloads and high-performance motors for hybrid electric aircraft.

My Summer Internship

The past 10 weeks at Princeton Satellite Systems have been a life changing experience. During my summer off from the University of Pennsylvania, I have worked as an intern for the company. This gave me the opportunity to learn from trailblazers in the industry and to be immersed in a community passionate and dedicated to the work.

I first heard of Princeton Satellite Systems at the Dawn of Private Space Science Symposium in 2017. After that, Mike graciously agreed to come speak for the Penn Aerospace Club in the fall and the Ivy Space Coalition Conference the next spring. Everyone in attendance was fascinated by the presentation and I felt so lucky that I would have the chance to learn so much more soon. Connections like these are what drive the aerospace community and as I expand my communication I hope to stay closely in touch with the people I came to know at PSS.

Through my work, I’ve been doing a lot of Matlab modeling: sizing the components for the Direct Fusion Drive engine, testing a rotating detonation engine, and MHD plasma simulation. The idea of these technologies enhancing propulsive power and efficiency is fascinating and has great potential for the future of space travel.

My summer at Princeton Satellite Systems has helped me to enhance my technical understanding and skills: I’ve definitely gained a ton of experience in Matlab, and all of my studying of plasma modeling should give me a head start in my fluids class next semester! I’ve also gained a much better understanding of how the professional world works. I got to help write and edit proposals, sit in on phone calls, and even attend the NIAC meeting at Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.

I think that there’s a great benefit in working at a smaller company. You are given plenty of real responsibility and see the changes happening in real time. I will definitely take the lessons I’ve learned this summer and apply them to my education as well as my future career as a mechanical engineer.

I am so grateful for this opportunity. Everyone has been so kind and helpful and patient. The time has flown by, and it definitely made staying in my little Princeton dorm with no air conditioning well worth it! I’ll miss coming in to work every day but I can’t wait to see all the big things that PSS accomplishes.