PSS at Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Open House

On Saturday April 1, PSS participated in the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Open House to show case our Direct Fusion Drive and our conceptual nine-month manned space mission to Mars in 2024! Our new fusion engine enables shorter transfer times and total mission durations, critical for interplanetary manned space flight. We had great interest in our human mission and many budding astronauts were ready to sign up for the trip.

PPPLOpenHouse2013

Please see our educational page for some fun DFD material for your space enthusiast:

http://www.psatellite.com/research/education.php

More information on this exciting project is available on our Fusion webpage:

http://www.psatellite.com/research/fusion.php

Our SunStation products for Home Back-Up and EV Charging were also on display at the PPPL Open House. SunStation is a green way to provide emergency power to critical loads in your home during an electrical service interruption or to charge your electric vehicle without using any grid power!

 

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Open House

Please join us at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory from 9 am to 4 pm  on June 1, 2013.

http://www.pppl.gov/openhouse

We will have exhibits on our Direct Fusion Drive, a collaborative project with PPPL to develop a nuclear fusion rocket engine for space propulsion, and on our SunStations for home electrical power backup and electric vehicle charging.

Get to Mars Quickly with the Direct Fusion Drive

Do you really want to spend the next 501 days locked in a tiny room with your spouse, hurtling toward the Red Planet just to take a few snap shots from 100 miles away? What about competing with 10,000  people to build the first Martian colony on a “Big Brother”-style reality TV series?

What if you could just go for a few months to do some research?  What if you could not only get there quickly but without any of the radiation dangers from fission or even from burning deuterium-tritium fuels?

The Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) is a novel system that we have been developing with the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and two weeks ago we filed a thrust-augmentation patent for the DFD.  Propellant gasses such as deuterium and helium can be pumped into a gas box and weakly ionized. These flow out along the magnetic field lines of the scrape off layer and pass around the closed-field region of the field-reversed configuration.  Fusion products fly out into the scrape off layer at 25 millions meters a second and collide with the propellant, heating it up (and therefore speeding it up), and then everything gets ejected through the magnetic nozzle.

If propellant wasn’t added, then the fusion products would give the spacecraft a velocity of around 25 million meters per second but would provide only a fraction of a Newton.  By adding propellant, the exhaust velocity drops directly proportional to the thrust.  An exhaust velocity of a few dozen km per second is sufficient for many missions and therefore tens and even hundreds of newtons of thrust can be achieved.