Nuclear Fusion Power and Propulsion in the News

We just started our latest project for ARPA-E under the ARPA-E GAMOW program in which we will be build power amplifiers for fusion reactors. The goal is to lower the cost and increase the reliability of fusion reactor power electronics. We currently have grants under the DOE INFUSE program and another ARPA-E project that is part of the ARPA-E OPEN 2018 program. We just finished a NASA STTR grant to study the effects of plasma pulses on low temperature superconducting coils.

For those who have been following our work, you know that there are many articles and videos about our work. For your convenience, we’ve collected many of the URLs for them in this blog post.

2020 NJ Edison Patent Award (You’ll need to look for our award on this page. The others are interesting too!)

Popular Mechanics: The Direct Fusion Drive that Could Get Us to Saturn in Just 2 Years, Oct 21, 2020

Universe Today – Titan mission paper from Polito, Oct 19, 2020

ITER article: Space Propulsion: Have Fusion, Will Travel, July 15, 2019

Space Q, August 29, 2019 – Podcast replay of May 29, 2019 FISO

Space.com: Fusion-Powered Spacecraft Could Be Just a Decade Away, Mike Wall, June 11, 2019

PPPL press release: PPPL physicist receives funding to research improvements to unique fusion device, March, 2019

Could Tiny Fusion Rockets Revolutionize Spaceflight? June 12, 2017

Will Mini Fusion Rockets Provide Spaceflight’s Next Big Leap? Charles Choi, June 9, 2017

Video of DFD talk from DPSS 2017 (Facebook)

Essay by John G. Cramer, NIAC external council, June 30, 2016

NASA 360 video on Facebook, Pluto mission, June 13, 2017

Futurism: NASA-Funded Company Wants to Redefine Space Travel With Fusion Rockets, June 13, 2017

Princeton Field Reversed Configuration Fusion Reactor for Space Rocket Propulsion, Federal Lab Consortium award, 2018

Time.com: Going to Mars via Fusion Power, 2013

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About Michael Paluszek

Michael Paluszek is President of Princeton Satellite Systems. He graduated from MIT with a degree in electrical engineering in 1976 and followed that with an Engineer's degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT in 1979. He worked at MIT for a year as a research engineer then worked at Draper Laboratory for 6 years on GN&C for human space missions. He worked at GE Astro Space from 1986 to 1992 on a variety of satellite projects including GPS IIR, Inmarsat 3 and Mars Observer. In 1992 he founded Princeton Satellite Systems.

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